Gnossiennes No.1, 2, 3 & 4

The Gnossiennes are seven pieces for piano composed by Erik Satie between 1889 and 1897 but in my album "Piano Lullabies Baby Sleep Music", I decided to insert only the first four because seemed to be closest to a lullaby genre. Many say that the title Gnossiennes derives from the palace of Knossos present on … Continue reading Gnossiennes No.1, 2, 3 & 4

J S Bach Fugue No. 1 in C major, BWV 846, from Bach’s Well-tempered Clavier

  The Fuga is one of the most complex and original compositions of J.S. Bach. This genre is characterized by the imitation where voices enter like a “relay race”. We can find in it the exposition in the first 6 bars, the counter-exposition at bars 7-10, the six Stretti, a tonic pedal at bars 24-27 and … Continue reading J S Bach Fugue No. 1 in C major, BWV 846, from Bach’s Well-tempered Clavier

Oginski, M. Polonaise: Les Adieaux à la patrie

Michał Kleofas Ogiński was born in Guzów, Żyrardów County near Warsaw September,25 in 1765 and was dead in Florence, Italy October, 15 in 1833. He was buried in the Pantheon of great personalities in the Church of Santa Croce in Florence near to Galileo, Michelangelo, Rossini, Machiavelli, Czartoryski Princesses. He was a Polish diplomat and politician Grand Treasurer of Lithuania and a senator of Tsar Alexander I. He was also a composer of the earliest romantic music and this polonaise explain very good his composition's style.

Erik Satie Gymnopédie No.1, 2 & 3

Erik Satie (17 May 1866 – 1 July 1925) was a French composer and pianist. He studied at the Paris Conservatoire, but the professors judged him lacked in talent and he didn't obtain a diploma. In the 1880s he worked as a pianist in café-cabaret in Montmartre, Paris, where composed his Gymnopédies. He also wrote music for the Rosicrucian, a sect … Continue reading Erik Satie Gymnopédie No.1, 2 & 3

Chopin: Mazurka Op.7 No.4

The last of the mazurkas from opus 7 in A flat major is:  [...an unquestionable cliché of folk music...Tadeusz Zieliński wrote that this Mazurka was ‘taken note for note from folklore’] according to professor Mieczysław Tomaszewski,  This Mazurka was dedicated to Paul Emile Johns, a composer, known as the first who performed a Beethoven piano … Continue reading Chopin: Mazurka Op.7 No.4

Chopin: Mazurka Op.7 No.3

The Mazurka Op.7 n.3 is the only one in the set to feature no repeats. It returns to a folkish and rustic surround. The scene opens pianissimo with a sound like a bagpipes, then an Oberek appears as the principal theme. This is followed by a Kujawiak, interrupted by the violent entrance of a Mazur … Continue reading F. Chopin: Mazurka Op.7 N.3

Chopin: Mazurka Op.7 No.2

Mazurka Op. 7 No. 2 was composed by Chopin in a minor key. It has an intimate sound and sometimes tends to be grateful. The central part instead seems to evoke a piece of medieval festival music with a trumpet ring. In fact, in the album of Elsner's daughter, Emilia was found in a previous … Continue reading Chopin: Mazurka Op.7 No.2

Chopin: Mazurka Op.7 No.1

This Mazurka is in B flat major, Szulc wrote that ‘it has hired the length and breadth of Poland. This mazurka is similar in character to the ‘drinking song’ titled ‘Hulanka’. This Mazurka has the form of a rondo. The refrain, of unconventional design, thrusts its way upwards, swinging and swaggering, before falling back down … Continue reading Chopin: Mazurka Op.7 No.1

Chopin: Mazurka Op.30 No.2

This Mazurka is in B minor. It has a peculiar music character that combines a minor key with a moderate tempo. The opening theme is based on a play of dynamics, alternating between piano and forte. In its wake, a curiously breathless motif comes to the forte, repeated insistently, on ever-higher degrees of the scale. … Continue reading Chopin: Mazurka Op.30 No.2